mattmorriswerks:

Viviane Sassencodex
minimalistblack:

Central Park by Abelardo Morell 

minimalistblack:

Central Park by Abelardo Morell 

art21:

"Like any artwork, things become richer if you know more about them; but I don’t think that’s crucial." —Glenn Ligon

New episode in Art21’s Exclusive series: Glenn Ligon discusses texts and cultural events, such as the writings of James Baldwin and the Million Man March, that inspired some of his paintings.

WATCH: Glenn Ligon: Layers of Meaning

IMAGES (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP):

Installation view of Glenn Ligon: Off Book at Regen Projects II, Los Angeles, CA, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Glenn Ligon, Figure #20, detail, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Installation view of Glenn Ligon: Some Changes at The Power Plant, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2005.

Glenn Ligon, Condition Report, detail, right panel, 2000. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Glenn Ligon, Hands, detail, 1996. Collection of Eileen Harris Norton. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Glenn Ligon, Hands, detail, 1996. Collection of Eileen Harris Norton. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Glenn Ligon, Condition Report, detail, right panel, 2000. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Glenn Ligon, Figure #21, detail, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Whites are drawn to Black culture because of the extraordinary quality of it, our aesthetic, our style. We set the styles. We are the trendsetters of America. America is known globally for its culture, which is Black.

They want to look like us, but they don’t want to be us. They don’t want to live in our skin. It’s kind of a cultural voyeurism. It allows white people to safely tour Blackness without being subjected to the reality of being Black.

Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, Jet Magazine Jun 25, 2001

(via bitteroreo)

the motherfucking tea 

(via feelonious)

Say it again for the people in the back.

(via shepherdsnotsheep)

(Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower)

lostinurbanism:

"Russell Lee, Negro boys on Easter morning in the southside, Chicago (1941)"
Fascinated with this photograph, no matter how often I’ve come across it in my lifetime, it always takes me back to this Deborah Willis interview where she discusses the beauty in African-American imagery and the importance of documenting. Inspired by Deb Willis, the Lost in Urbanism blog is my personal attempt to highlight the same beauty through imagery of the black and brown. 
Also, as the creator of Sunday Kinfolk, a platform used for storytelling, I’ve recently referenced a call for submissions to create a collective story for anyone who would like to submit their documentary, portrait and street photography from this upcoming Easter weekend. I’ll use the photographs to create and curate a collective story about our style, personal stories and traditions as a way to show just how interconnected we are as a culture, no matter where we’re located. Even if, this is not a holiday that you celebrate.
Answers to a couple of the common questions I’ve received: 
1. Do I have to be a professional or an aspiring photographer? Not at all. I’ve posted so many photographs from people who have just stumbled upon photography, it’s unbelievable. I just want you to document your stories, our stories, perhaps your commute .. maybe your way to the store, time with family, before/after service, hair salon, barbershop.. wherever, just document. 
2. Film or Digital? Black and White or Color? All of the aforementioned. 
I’ll accept up to 5 submissions per contributor through May 11th. Edit as necessary and email them to sundaykinfolk [at] gmail.com .. Please also include your name, location of the photograph, subjects (as needed) and link to your tumblr and/or website.  
Looking forward to creating our collective story.

lostinurbanism:

"Russell Lee, Negro boys on Easter morning in the southside, Chicago (1941)"

Fascinated with this photograph, no matter how often I’ve come across it in my lifetime, it always takes me back to this Deborah Willis interview where she discusses the beauty in African-American imagery and the importance of documenting. Inspired by Deb Willis, the Lost in Urbanism blog is my personal attempt to highlight the same beauty through imagery of the black and brown. 

Also, as the creator of Sunday Kinfolk, a platform used for storytelling, I’ve recently referenced a call for submissions to create a collective story for anyone who would like to submit their documentary, portrait and street photography from this upcoming Easter weekend. I’ll use the photographs to create and curate a collective story about our style, personal stories and traditions as a way to show just how interconnected we are as a culture, no matter where we’re located. Even if, this is not a holiday that you celebrate.

Answers to a couple of the common questions I’ve received: 

1. Do I have to be a professional or an aspiring photographer? Not at all. I’ve posted so many photographs from people who have just stumbled upon photography, it’s unbelievable. I just want you to document your stories, our stories, perhaps your commute .. maybe your way to the store, time with family, before/after service, hair salon, barbershop.. wherever, just document. 

2. Film or Digital? Black and White or Color? All of the aforementioned. 

I’ll accept up to 5 submissions per contributor through May 11th. Edit as necessary and email them to sundaykinfolk [at] gmail.com .. Please also include your name, location of the photograph, subjects (as needed) and link to your tumblr and/or website.  

Looking forward to creating our collective story.

atavus:

Takehito Etani - The Third Eye Project, 2002

killerbeesting:

Daniel Kramer

killerbeesting:

Daniel Kramer

dc-via-chicago:

GPOY

dc-via-chicago:

GPOY

(Source: afirahs)

kameelahwrites:

Almost done with this installation and I will get my life back until the end of April when I begin to prep for another installation. Clearly, I love installations. This installation is in a show at the Center for Book Arts and opens this Friday. It is a consideration of the proliferation of religious literature I have collected over the years and includes: a reinterpretation of the NYC subway map to plot the location of street preachers and religious distribution sites, a small library of religious tracts, a book of experimental scripture which is a recyclopedia/mash up of excerpts from those tracts, a mixtape of collected street demons and photographs of religious sites.

kameelahwrites:

Almost done with this installation and I will get my life back until the end of April when I begin to prep for another installation. Clearly, I love installations. This installation is in a show at the Center for Book Arts and opens this Friday. It is a consideration of the proliferation of religious literature I have collected over the years and includes: a reinterpretation of the NYC subway map to plot the location of street preachers and religious distribution sites, a small library of religious tracts, a book of experimental scripture which is a recyclopedia/mash up of excerpts from those tracts, a mixtape of collected street demons and photographs of religious sites.

tionam:

elixherfix:

(via Janet Mock Covers ELIXHER’s “Body Issue”)

Author and trans advocate Janet Mock bares it all for the latest issue of ELIXHER Magazine. The New York Times bestselling author of Redefining Realness makes a bold statement by posing nude for the print and digital publication. Along with three other Black queer women storytellers—activist Kim Crosby, Black Girl Dangerous‘ Mia McKenzie, and filmmaker Tiona McClodden—she sheds her layers, and talks reclaiming our bodies and narratives.
“I’ve always been interested in the idea of not only reclaiming our stories but also our bodies,” Mock shares in the upcoming issue. “Because of respectability politics we tend not to talk about what we do with our bodies, even within queer and trans communities.”
ELIXHER Magazine‘s “Body Issue” delves into identity, agency, and truth-telling. Also in this issue: One woman shares her struggle with surrogacy; readers reveal their feelings about body hair; and more.
The issue is now available for pre-order. General sales begin Friday, May 30. Skip the wait and pre-order today. Celebrate the issue release with our cover girl Janet Mock and contributors on Friday., May 30, 8 p.m., at Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, NY. Advanced tickets available here. 
 

tionam:

elixherfix:

(via Janet Mock Covers ELIXHER’s “Body Issue”)

Author and trans advocate Janet Mock bares it all for the latest issue of ELIXHER Magazine. The New York Times bestselling author of Redefining Realness makes a bold statement by posing nude for the print and digital publication. Along with three other Black queer women storytellers—activist Kim CrosbyBlack Girl Dangerous‘ Mia McKenzie, and filmmaker Tiona McClodden—she sheds her layers, and talks reclaiming our bodies and narratives.

“I’ve always been interested in the idea of not only reclaiming our stories but also our bodies,” Mock shares in the upcoming issue. “Because of respectability politics we tend not to talk about what we do with our bodies, even within queer and trans communities.”

ELIXHER Magazine‘s “Body Issue” delves into identity, agency, and truth-telling. Also in this issue: One woman shares her struggle with surrogacy; readers reveal their feelings about body hair; and more.

The issue is now available for pre-order. General sales begin Friday, May 30. Skip the wait and pre-order todayCelebrate the issue release with our cover girl Janet Mock and contributors on Friday., May 30, 8 p.m., at Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, NY. Advanced tickets available here

 

mambubadu:

Postcards have arrived for our show!

mambubadu:

Postcards have arrived for our show!

cre8tivesilence:

…and then you shoot your cousin,  The Roots album cover artwork by Romare Bearden.

cre8tivesilence:

…and then you shoot your cousin,  The Roots album cover artwork by Romare Bearden.

uniquenoir:




Black Weirdo Of The Week 18: Mambu Badu
Name:
MAMBU BADU is composed of Allison McDaniel, Danielle Scruggs, Kameelah Rasheed, and Yodith Dammlash

From:
MAMBU BADU was birthed on the internet through Twitter, but all of us—with the exception of Kameelah (based in BK)—can be found in the DC Metro Area.
Mini Bio:
MAMBU BADU is a collective of cultural producers and artists who curate art-based experiences that center the process and product of black self-identified women with a focus on photo-based work.

Founded in 2010 by Kameelah Rasheed, Allison McDaniel, and Danielle Scruggs, we curate biannual shows and publications in addition to independent projects. For 2014, we will be curating a show in Washington D.C.’s Vivid Solutions Gallery as well as organizing a series of public programming to bridge the gap between the gallery and the community. In the past, MAMBU BADU collective founders have curated art experiences in spaces such as the Median (Washington, D.C.) and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (Harlem, NY).
We are especially keen on collaborations that encourage community engagement, inquiry, and artistic exploration. While MAMBU BADU began as a collective of photographers, our vision has evolved to create space to not only create art but to interrogate art practices. We want to explore the dialectical relationship between theory and practice as well as the space between contemplation and creation. We want to map the materialization of thoughts and histories. 

When not working with MB,

Danielle works as a photo editor at LivingSocial, shoots her own personal projects, elbows her way to the front row at concerts at her favorite venues in DC (Black Cat, 9:30, Howard Theatre), listens to a lot of public radio, and drinks a lot of coffee. She is also a co-founder of DDAY Collective, created specifically to support and promote emerging artists of black/African descent in the DC Metropolitan area.


Kameelah works as a gallery studio instructor at the Brooklyn Museum. After five years of teaching in the public schools and a decade of working with youth, she is now a teacher coach guiding NYC public school teachers in strong curriculum development and instruction. When not working, she is a researcher exploring Black Atlantic spiritual traditions, a seeker of nature in NYC, a closeted fiction writer and an interviewer who has penned conversations with writers and artists like Kiese Laymon, Victor LaValle, Nnedi Okorafor and Dread Scott.


Yodith works on her own personal projects (mainly that exploring her Ethiopian ancestry and black womanhood), is stuck in the 1990s musically, is always on the hunt for a new photography book and never passes up bubble tea.





Allison works random day jobs, freelances as a graphic designer and photographer, prints entirely too many JSTOR articles, and is always on the hunt for a new bourbon.

What is your craft/career/creative expression?
We live in the space of photo-based art — from traditional fine art photography to mixed-medium to image appropriation.

How long have you been working at your craft?
MAMBU BADU will have its fourth birthday on September 20, 2014.
Danielle has been a photographer for most of her life, but didn’t take it seriously until around 2007, when she was 22 and a year out of her undergraduate studies.

Kameelah’s mother says she was asking a lot of questions, taking observation notes, and sketching since she could talk and hold a pen.    Professionally? Five Years.

Yodith has been photographing since 2004 when she decided to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Art Photography.

Allison took a darkroom course in 2001 and has been obsessed since.
Why do you consider yourself a Black Weirdo?


Danielle is a Black Weirdo because she has always resided in the margins of the margins. Always slightly offbeat and off-kilter and never quite in lockstep with what’s popular. Which she realizes is actually an ok thing.

Kameelah is a Black Weirdo because she approaches the world with the curiosity of a 7-year-old kid.

Yodith is a Black Weirdo because she always considered herself to be in two worlds, of two cultures, which sometimes leaves her on the outside of both. Raised in America by immigrant parents, she is as undeniably African-American as she is an Ethiopian in America.

Allison is a Black Weirdo because normality is the nemesis of creativity.


Links/Social Media:
Mambu Badu  
@mambubadu - twitter, tumblr, instagram, and FB
MambuBadu.com -main site
Danielle 

@dascruggs- twitter, instagram
daniellescruggs.com - portfolio site

blog.daniellescrugs.com -journal/inspiration repository

Kameelah 

Twitter: @_kameelahr
Instagram: kameelahr
www.kameelahr.com - portfolio site
www.blog.kameelahr.com - blog

Yodith 

@yodithnprogress- twitter, instagram
Yodithd.com- portfolio/website
Yodithinprogress.tumblr.com- blog/inspirations

Allison
@alice_wonder - twitter
@missalicewonder - instagram
alicewonder.tumblr.com - visual reference materials and folio work

Upcoming events/ projects? 

MAMBU BADU
May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9


Danielle 
 March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery 

March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery 


April 2014: Officially launching The Vanguard, an audio-visual exploration of the creative processes and practices of visual, literary, and performing artists in the D.C. Metropolitan area


July 2014: Solo exhibit of photographic work as part of DDAY Collective’s quarterly solo showcases


Kameelah 



March 1-May 10 — Arts Educator // Brooklyn Museum — Teaching youth digital media class in conjunction with the exhibition, Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties (NYC) through a fictional department of the US government called DISPUS (Department for Inquiry on Social Problems and their Urgent Solutions) where students photograph and interview Brooklyn residents regarding social problems.



April 5th: Group Exhibit // The Afrofuturist Affair: The Time Travel Convention at Yell Gallery (Philly) // installed a time travel machine using found material culture and published a hand bound book entitled “how to time travel with your mother’s hair, used tea bags and found photographs: a handbook and starter kit for practical time travel” (edition of 10)


April 12th: Panelist // NYU for the Radical Archiving Conference // speaking with other archivists about my first solo installation No Instructions for Assembly where I created a 30’ x 20’ x 20’ installation using fragments and found material culture to reimagine my family’s archive and to  activate dialogues around a trinity of spatial trauma - homelessness, displacement, and forced migration.



April 18th: Group Exhibit // The Center for Book Arts - exploring themes born from transient religious encounters and found religious pamphlets over the past 7 years 1) debut of conceptual sound art project that features collected street sermons 2) a book of scripture prose that plays with intertextuality, William S. Boroughs’ aleatory cut-up literary methods, Jean Lescure of Oulipo’s N+7 procedure, and Harryette Mullen’s abecedarian games 3) a reinterpreted subway map and 4) a series of digital c-prints of religious sites (NYC)


June 13th: Artist Talk // Center for Book Arts (NYC)



May 17th:  Panelist // Queens Museum for Open Engagement Conference, “Dropping In/Dropping Out of Communities” — discussing rituals and ethics around social practice art work in communities that may not be our own (NYC)


May/June: Group Exhibit // (Can’t share all the deets now but it will be a large installation that takes over an entire one bedroom apartment to explore ideas of democratized archiving, vestigial flickers and audience activation of spaces)



July 2014: Artist-in-Residence // Vermont Studio Center - will be working on a series of large text drawings and a javascript-based program exploring the parallels between computer errors and the messages and microaggressions marginalized people encounter (VT)


July 2014: Teaching Artist-in-Residence // Working Classroom, teaching 2 week class around using found materials to create installations and sculptural pieces that address migration, transition, and displacement  (NM)


August 2014: Continuing work documenting black religious communities in the North East


Yodith 
Currently working on an archival project involving slides photographed by my uncle in in the 1960s during his world travels.

uniquenoir:

Black Weirdo Of The Week 18: Mambu Badu

Name:

MAMBU BADU is composed of Allison McDaniel, Danielle Scruggs, Kameelah Rasheed, and Yodith Dammlash

From:

MAMBU BADU was birthed on the internet through Twitter, but all of us—with the exception of Kameelah (based in BK)—can be found in the DC Metro Area.

Mini Bio:

MAMBU BADU is a collective of cultural producers and artists who curate art-based experiences that center the process and product of black self-identified women with a focus on photo-based work.

Founded in 2010 by Kameelah Rasheed, Allison McDaniel, and Danielle Scruggs, we curate biannual shows and publications in addition to independent projects. For 2014, we will be curating a show in Washington D.C.’s Vivid Solutions Gallery as well as organizing a series of public programming to bridge the gap between the gallery and the community. In the past, MAMBU BADU collective founders have curated art experiences in spaces such as the Median (Washington, D.C.) and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (Harlem, NY).

We are especially keen on collaborations that encourage community engagement, inquiry, and artistic exploration. While MAMBU BADU began as a collective of photographers, our vision has evolved to create space to not only create art but to interrogate art practices. We want to explore the dialectical relationship between theory and practice as well as the space between contemplation and creation. We want to map the materialization of thoughts and histories.

When not working with MB,

Danielle works as a photo editor at LivingSocial, shoots her own personal projects, elbows her way to the front row at concerts at her favorite venues in DC (Black Cat, 9:30, Howard Theatre), listens to a lot of public radio, and drinks a lot of coffee. She is also a co-founder of DDAY Collective, created specifically to support and promote emerging artists of black/African descent in the DC Metropolitan area.

Kameelah works as a gallery studio instructor at the Brooklyn Museum. After five years of teaching in the public schools and a decade of working with youth, she is now a teacher coach guiding NYC public school teachers in strong curriculum development and instruction. When not working, she is a researcher exploring Black Atlantic spiritual traditions, a seeker of nature in NYC, a closeted fiction writer and an interviewer who has penned conversations with writers and artists like Kiese Laymon, Victor LaValle, Nnedi Okorafor and Dread Scott.

Yodith works on her own personal projects (mainly that exploring her Ethiopian ancestry and black womanhood), is stuck in the 1990s musically, is always on the hunt for a new photography book and never passes up bubble tea.

Allison works random day jobs, freelances as a graphic designer and photographer, prints entirely too many JSTOR articles, and is always on the hunt for a new bourbon.

What is your craft/career/creative expression?

We live in the space of photo-based art — from traditional fine art photography to mixed-medium to image appropriation.

How long have you been working at your craft?

MAMBU BADU will have its fourth birthday on September 20, 2014.

Danielle has been a photographer for most of her life, but didn’t take it seriously until around 2007, when she was 22 and a year out of her undergraduate studies.

Kameelah’s mother says she was asking a lot of questions, taking observation notes, and sketching since she could talk and hold a pen.    Professionally? Five Years.

Yodith has been photographing since 2004 when she decided to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Art Photography.

Allison took a darkroom course in 2001 and has been obsessed since.

Why do you consider yourself a Black Weirdo?

Danielle is a Black Weirdo because she has always resided in the margins of the margins. Always slightly offbeat and off-kilter and never quite in lockstep with what’s popular. Which she realizes is actually an ok thing.

Kameelah is a Black Weirdo because she approaches the world with the curiosity of a 7-year-old kid.

Yodith is a Black Weirdo because she always considered herself to be in two worlds, of two cultures, which sometimes leaves her on the outside of both. Raised in America by immigrant parents, she is as undeniably African-American as she is an Ethiopian in America.

Allison is a Black Weirdo because normality is the nemesis of creativity.

Links/Social Media:

Mambu Badu  

@mambubadu - twitter, tumblr, instagram, and FB

MambuBadu.com -main site

Danielle 

@dascruggs- twitter, instagram

daniellescruggs.com - portfolio site

blog.daniellescrugs.com -journal/inspiration repository

Kameelah 

Twitter: @_kameelahr

Instagram: kameelahr

www.kameelahr.com - portfolio site

www.blog.kameelahr.com - blog

Yodith 

@yodithnprogress- twitter, instagram

Yodithd.com- portfolio/website

Yodithinprogress.tumblr.com- blog/inspirations

Allison

@alice_wonder - twitter

@missalicewonder - instagram

alicewonder.tumblr.com - visual reference materials and folio work

Upcoming events/ projects?

MAMBU BADU

May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

  • May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

Danielle

  • March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery
  • March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery

  • April 2014: Officially launching The Vanguard, an audio-visual exploration of the creative processes and practices of visual, literary, and performing artists in the D.C. Metropolitan area

  • July 2014: Solo exhibit of photographic work as part of DDAY Collective’s quarterly solo showcases

Kameelah

  • March 1-May 10 — Arts Educator // Brooklyn Museum — Teaching youth digital media class in conjunction with the exhibition, Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties (NYC) through a fictional department of the US government called DISPUS (Department for Inquiry on Social Problems and their Urgent Solutions) where students photograph and interview Brooklyn residents regarding social problems.

  • April 5th: Group Exhibit // The Afrofuturist Affair: The Time Travel Convention at Yell Gallery (Philly) // installed a time travel machine using found material culture and published a hand bound book entitled “how to time travel with your mother’s hair, used tea bags and found photographs: a handbook and starter kit for practical time travel” (edition of 10)

  • April 12th: Panelist // NYU for the Radical Archiving Conference // speaking with other archivists about my first solo installation No Instructions for Assembly where I created a 30’ x 20’ x 20’ installation using fragments and found material culture to reimagine my family’s archive and to  activate dialogues around a trinity of spatial trauma - homelessness, displacement, and forced migration.

  • April 18th: Group Exhibit // The Center for Book Arts - exploring themes born from transient religious encounters and found religious pamphlets over the past 7 years 1) debut of conceptual sound art project that features collected street sermons 2) a book of scripture prose that plays with intertextuality, William S. Boroughs’ aleatory cut-up literary methods, Jean Lescure of Oulipo’s N+7 procedure, and Harryette Mullen’s abecedarian games 3) a reinterpreted subway map and 4) a series of digital c-prints of religious sites (NYC)

  • June 13th: Artist Talk // Center for Book Arts (NYC)

  • May 17th:  Panelist // Queens Museum for Open Engagement Conference, “Dropping In/Dropping Out of Communities” — discussing rituals and ethics around social practice art work in communities that may not be our own (NYC)

  • May/June: Group Exhibit // (Can’t share all the deets now but it will be a large installation that takes over an entire one bedroom apartment to explore ideas of democratized archiving, vestigial flickers and audience activation of spaces)

  • July 2014: Artist-in-Residence // Vermont Studio Center - will be working on a series of large text drawings and a javascript-based program exploring the parallels between computer errors and the messages and microaggressions marginalized people encounter (VT)

  • July 2014: Teaching Artist-in-Residence // Working Classroom, teaching 2 week class around using found materials to create installations and sculptural pieces that address migration, transition, and displacement  (NM)

  • August 2014: Continuing work documenting black religious communities in the North East

Yodith

Currently working on an archival project involving slides photographed by my uncle in in the 1960s during his world travels.